Smiths Falls presents water storage options to residents

June 13, 2018 by
 Mark Buchanan, civil engineer with J.L.Richards the consulting firm helping the town of Smiths Falls find solutions to the water storage deficit walks residents through the options available to the town, at an information session held in the evening of Tuesday June 12 at the Smiths Falls Curling Club.


Mark Buchanan, civil engineer with J.L.Richards the consulting firm helping the town of Smiths Falls find solutions to the water storage deficit walks residents through the options available to the town, at an information session held in the evening of Tuesday June 12 at the Smiths Falls Curling Club.

Smiths Falls water storage is well below the Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change recommended levels. The town has been working on coming up with a solution to address that deficit.

They’ve hired the engineering firm of JL Richards to come up with options for council and the public to consider.

“The town’s current water storage is well below the MOECC recommendation for storage,” explained Mark Buchanan, civil engineer with J.L Richards at a public information session held on Tuesday June 11th.

The town currently has 1,820 cubic meters of water storage but based on the current population and industry needs, should have 6,281 cubic meters of storage capacity.

Meanwhile the old water tower in Confederation Park is on its last legs and is not nearly big enough to serve the needs of the town now or into the future.

“The old one has to go it’s going to cost too much to refurbish it, and with the town growing the way it is we need something that will support the whole town and the future as well,” said town resident Korleen Manwell after taking in the information at the open house.

SF Water Tower 2017

The current tower's lifespan is almost up.

Working with town staff J.L. Richards have come up with a few possible solutions. Meanwhile council and staff are leaning towards decommissioning the old water tower, and building a new larger elevated storage tank at the north-eastern edge of town on Air Care Drive.

“I’d like to see an elevated tower at the North Eastern edge of town, because it’s a higher elevation at that end,” said Ted Joynt, Superintendent of Utilities.

Building a new tower where the old tower is right now would cost up to $7 million, while relocating it could cost up to $9 million because new water mains would have to be installed.

“There is certainly a difference in pricing.   I think if I had to vote I’d probably say Confederation Drive location, but you know I could live with the Air Care Drive solution too,” said town resident and former Councillor Wendy Alford, after taking in the information presented.

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1 Comment

  1. Wayne Wohlfahrt

    It should stay where it is. It is the cities icon and $2,000,000 is a lot that's $200 dollars per person in the city and our taxes are high enough as is.

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